Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

What is the new Project Celadon release?

A:

The new Project Celadon release refers to the source code that makes up the September 2019 Project Celadon Release (20-Sept-2019), and each release since. While Project Celadon had long supported Android* on bare metal deployments using Intel® Architecture, there was no support for virtualized deployments of Android on Intel architecture. The Celadon community filled that gap with the September 2019 release, which allows one Android image to be deployed across Virtual Machines (VM) on Intel® architectures. Celadon source code can be used across a variety of Intel hardware, including Intel® NUC Kit NUC6CAYH. Please check out Release Notes for all the latest detailed release features.

Q:

Why might developers and independent software vendors want to use Celadon in VM?

A:

The new Project Celadon packaging still only takes one step to install, and in addition to gaining VM and container support for Android on Intel® Architecture, developers and ISVs will continue experiencing:

  • Open platform enabling helping developers speed time to market across a variety of infrastructures
  • Compliance with the Android Compatibility Test Suite (CTS), as well as additional test suites on leading platforms and configurations
  • Functionality across a variety of Intel hardware, including Intel® NUC Kit NUC6CAYH
  • Rich vertical solution configurations allowing for ease of scalability and extensibility across market segments
  Celadon in VM
Operating
System
Virtualized Celadon deployments include Celadon running
as a guest operating system in a virtual machine, in a
virtualized environment.
Security
& Isolation
Running Celadon in a virtualized environment provides a
stronger separation between guest VMs and host VM, leading
to superior component isolation vs containerized deployments.
Resource
Consumption
& Density
Virtualized Celadon deployments run at moderate densities;
less than containerized deployments, but more than bare
metal deployments.
Q:

Can Celadon still be run on bare metal?

A:

Intel supports VM and Container configurations for Celadon. Users can potentially take the opensource Celadon project and run in different configurations including Native.

Note

Users should be aware that test suites provided by Google may not pass with 100% scoring if deploying Celadon on bare metal systems. While Celadon in VM deployments are supported by Google Mobile Services (GMS), Celadon on bare metal does not have GMS support. Dedicated use cases like retail, client, education and gaming do not need GMS. If there is a need for GMS while running Celadon on bare metal, direct communication with Google will be necessary.

Q:

What are some example use cases and workload/applications that benefit from the new Celadon releases?

A:

Digital Signage and Secure Payment solutions are ideal for virtualized deployments, due to the high security and scalability virtualized deployments provide. With Celadon in VM, however, developers and ISVs can continue utilizing Intel® hardware acceleration while having the flexibility to customize to the latest Android applications.

Overall, virtualized and containerized workloads are pervasive. Customers demand support for each workload deployment type - particularly for Android workloads. The latest Celadon release allows developers and ISV’s to consolidate workloads under one image, leading to boundless opportunities to provide broad market support.

Q:

Where can I learn more about Celadon in VM or Celadon in Containers?

A:

There are many ways users can learn more, starting with accessing release notes and software. Users can learn more by subscribing to the Project Celadon mailing list. Mailing list subscribers are kept up to date on the latest Celadon releases, updates and tools. Subscribers are also invited to Project Celadon focused events, like our monthly Technical Community Meetings, which provide a space for discussion around Celadon technical topics.

Q:

What license(s) does |C| use?

A:

Celadon consists of permissive and copyleft licenses such as BSD, MIT, Apache and GPL licenses. Use, reproduction and distribution of components of Celadon licensed under an open source software license are governed solely by the terms of that open source software license. Please refer and comply to the open source software license found in the source code files or repositories. Certain licenses such as Google Mobile Services or Widevine are not included in Celadon.

Q:

What Android desserts are supported in Celadon?

A:

The latest Android dessert is supported as soon as Google publicly releases the dessert. Please see the Release Notes for the latest supported desserts.

Q:

Will the latest Celadon work on older hardware that was previously supported?

A:

Celadon supports a variety of reference platforms, in addition to being device independent. Developers have the option to use an older manifest file to build an image for previously supported hardware, but Celadon’s main focus is enabling on the latest Intel platforms. As such, support on older platforms may be limited.

Q:

How could I start adding software components to my own |C| build?

A:

Celadon follows the same practice as Android for adding software components to the build.

Q:

I would like to contribute. Would Intel accept my contributions?

A:

Yes, we welcome contributions! Since Intel is responsible for the product management and core stack of Celadon, what ultimately is accepted is at the maintainers’ discretion. We will determine if it’s a good fit, then contributions will go through a review and verification process to maintain quality.